Oncotarget

Reviews:

Genetic factors associated with risk of metabolic syndrome and hepatocellular carcinoma

Ranran Tang, Heng Liu, Yingdi Yuan, Kaipeng Xie, Pengfei Xu, Xiaoyun Liu and Juan Wen _

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Oncotarget. 2017; 8:35403-35411. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.15893

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Abstract

Ranran Tang1,2,*, Heng Liu3,*, Yingdi Yuan1, Kaipeng Xie1,2, Pengfei Xu1,2, Xiaoyun Liu4 and Juan Wen1,2

1 Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Care Institute, Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

2 State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

3 Department of Pediatrics, Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

4 Department of Endocrinology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

* These authors have contributed equally to this work

Correspondence to:

Juan Wen, email:

Xiaoyun Liu, email:

Keywords: genetic factors, metabolic syndrome, obesity, HCC

Received: November 04, 2016 Accepted: February 15, 2017 Published: March 04, 2017

Abstract

Although the metabolic syndrome is a commonplace topic, its potential threats to public health is a problem that cannot be neglected. As the living conditions improved significantly over the past few years, the morbidity of metabolic syndrome has also steadily risen, and the onset age is becoming younger. The hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is one of the most prevalent life-threatening human cancers worldwide, incidence of which is also on the rise, gradually occupied the top of the list associated with metabolic syndrome related complication. Despite the advanced improvement of HCC management, the lifestyle, environmental factors, obesity, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have been recognized as risk factors for the development of liver cancer. In recent years, genetic studies, especially the genome-wide association studies (GWASs) were widely performed, a new era of the human genome research was created, which has significantly promoted the study of complex disease genetics. These progresses have contributed to the discovery of abundant number of genomic loci convincingly linked with complex metabolic feature and HCC. In this review, we briefly summarize the association between metabolic syndrome and HCC, focusing on the genetic factors contributed to metabolic syndrome and HCC.


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