Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Effect of alpha-lipoic acid on radiation-induced small intestine injury in mice

Bae Kwon Jeong, Jin Ho Song, Hojin Jeong, Hoon Sik Choi, Jung Hwa Jung, Jong Ryeal Hahm, Seung Hoon Woo, Myeong Hee Jung, Bong-Hoi Choi, Jin Hyun Kim and Ki Mun Kang _

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Oncotarget. 2016; 7:15105-15117. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.7874

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Abstract

Bae Kwon Jeong1,4, Jin Ho Song1,4, Hojin Jeong1,4, Hoon Sik Choi1, Jung Hwa Jung2,4, Jong Ryeal Hahm2,4, Seung Hoon Woo3,4, Myeong Hee Jung5, Bong-Hoi Choi6, Jin Hyun Kim4,5, Ki Mun Kang1,4

1Department of Radiation Oncology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine and Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Republic of Korea

2Department of Internal Medicine, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine and Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Republic of Korea

3Department of Otolaryngology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine and Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Republic of Korea

4Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Republic of Korea

5Biomedical Research Institute, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Republic of Korea

6Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Republic of Korea

Correspondence to:

Ki Mun Kang, e-mail: [email protected]

Jin Hyun Kim, e-mail: [email protected]

Keywords: radiation therapy, alpha-lipoic acid, small intestine, oxidative stress, inflammation

Received: October 05, 2015     Accepted: January 23, 2016     Published: March 03, 2016

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Radiation therapy is a highly effective treatment for patients with solid tumors. However, it can cause damage and inflammation in normal tissues. Here, we investigated the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) as radioprotection agent for the small intestine in a mouse model.

Materials and Methods: Whole abdomen was evenly irradiated with total a dose of 15 Gy. Mice were treated with either ALA (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection [i.p.]) or saline (equal volume, i.p.) the prior to radiation as 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days. Body weight, food intake, histopathology, and biochemical parameters were evaluated.

Results: Significant differences in body weight and food intake were observed between the radiation (RT) and ALA + RT groups. Moreover, the number of crypt cells was higher in the ALA + RT group. Inflammation was decreased and recovery time was shortened in the ALA + RT group compared with the RT group. The levels of inflammation-related factors (i.e., phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B and matrix metalloproteinase-9) and mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased in the ALA + RT group compared with those in the RT group.

Conclusions: ALA treatment prior to radiation decreases the severity and duration of radiation-induced enteritis by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell death.


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