Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Mesenchymal stem cells in combination with erythropoietin repair hyperoxia-induced alveoli dysplasia injury in neonatal mice via inhibition of TGF-β1 signaling

Yun Luan, Luan Zhang, Sun Chao, Xiaoli Liu, Kaili Li, Yibiao Wang _ and Zhaohua Zhang

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Oncotarget. 2016; 7:47082-47094. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.9314

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Abstract

Yun Luan1, Luan Zhang2, Sun Chao1, Xiaoli Liu3, Kaili Li1, Yibiao Wang2, Zhaohua Zhang2

1Central Research Laboratory, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, China

2Department of Pediatrics, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, China

3Department of Hematology, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, China

Correspondence to:

Yibiao Wang, e-mail: [email protected]

Zhaohua Zhang, e-mail: [email protected]

Keywords: BPD, MSCs, EPO, TGF-β1, ETM

Received: December 09, 2015    Accepted: April 11, 2016    Published: May 12, 2016

ABSTRACT

The aim of the present study is to investigate the protection effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in combination with EPO against hyperoxia-induced bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) injury in neonatal mice. BPD model was prepared by continuous high oxygen exposure, 1×106 bone marrow MSCs and 5000U/kg recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) were injected respectively. Results showed that administration of MSCs, EPO especially MSCs+EPO significant attenuated hyperoxia-induced lung damage with a decrease of fibrosis, radical alveolar counts and inhibition of the occurrence of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Furthermore, MSCs+EPO co-treatment more significantly suppressed the levels of transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) than MSCs or EPO alone. Collectively, these results suggested that MSCs, EPO in particular MSCs+EPO co-treatment could promote lung repair in hyperoxia-induced alveoli dysplasia injury via inhibition of TGF-β1 signaling pathway to further suppress EMT process and may be a promising therapeutic strategy.


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