Oncotarget

Research Papers:

CCL18 from tumor-associated macrophages promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer

Ling Lin _, Yong-Song Chen, Yan-Dan Yao, Jing-Qi Chen, Jia-Ning Chen, Song-Yin Huang, Yun-Jie Zeng, He-Rui Yao, Si-Hai Zeng, Yong-Shui Fu and Er-Wei Song

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Oncotarget. 2015; 6:34758-34773. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.5325

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Abstract

Ling Lin1,2,3,*, Yong-Song Chen3,*, Yan-Dan Yao1,2, Jing-Qi Chen1,2, Jia-Ning Chen1,2, Song-Yin Huang4, Yun-Jie Zeng5, He-Rui Yao6, Si-Hai Zeng7, Yong-Shui Fu7, Er-Wei Song1,2

1Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Medical Research Center, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120, P. R. China

2Breast Tumor Center, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120, P. R. China

3Department of Internal Medicine, the First Affiliated Hospital, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, P. R. China

4Department of Laboratory, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120, P. R. China

5Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120, P. R. China

6Department of Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120, P. R. China

7Guangzhou Blood Center, Guangzhou 510120, P. R. China

*These authors have contributed equally to this work

Correspondence to:

Er-Wei Song, e-mail: [email protected]

Yong-Shui Fu, e-mail: [email protected]

Si-Hai Zeng, e-mail: [email protected]

Keywords: breast cancer, tumor-associated macrophage, angiogenesis, CCL18, PITPNM3

Received: April 27, 2015     Accepted: September 11, 2015     Published: September 23, 2015

ABSTRACT

The infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is associated with extensive angiogenesis, which contributes to a poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, anti-angiogenic therapy with VEGF-specific monotherapy has been unsuccessful in treating breast cancer, and the molecular mechanisms associated with chemoresistance remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether CCL18, a chemokine produced by TAMs, can stimulate angiogenesis in breast cancer, as well as the underlying mechanisms. Double immunohistochemical staining for CCL18 and CD34/CD31/vWF was performed in 80 breast cancer samples to study the correlation between CCL18+ TAMs and microvascular density (MVD). Cocultures of TAMs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to model the inflammatory microenvironment, and CCL18-induced angiogenesis was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that CCL18+ TAM infiltration positively associated with MVD in breast cancer samples, which was correlated with tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. We confirmed, both in vitro and in vivo, that CCL18 and VEGF synergistically promoted endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. Conversely, blocking CCL18 or VEGF with neutralizing antibodies synergistically inhibited the promigratory effects of TAMs. Silencing PITPNM3, a putative CCL18 receptor, on the surface of HUVECs abrogated CCL18-mediated promigration and the enhancement of HUVEC tube formation, independently of VEGFR signaling. Moreover, CCL18 exposure induced the endothelial-mesenchymal transformation and activated ERK and Akt/GSK-3β/Snail signaling in HUVECs, thereby contributing to its pro-angiogenic effects. In conclusion, our findings suggest that CCL18 released from TAMs promotes angiogenesis and tumor progression in breast cancer; thus, CCL18 may serve as a novel target for anti-angiogenic therapies.


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