Oncotarget

Clinical Research Papers:

An analysis of whether sleep disorder will result in postpartum depression

Tu-Chen Chung _, Chi-Hsiang Chung, Hsuan-Ju Peng, Chang-Huei Tsao, Wu-Chien Chien and Huey-Fang Sun

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Oncotarget. 2018; 9:25304-25314. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.25219

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Abstract

Tu-Chen Chung1,3, Chi-Hsiang Chung2, Hsuan-Ju Peng3, Chang-Huei Tsao4, Wu-Chien Chien5 and Huey-Fang Sun6

1Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan

2School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan

3Department of Nursing, Taoyuan Armed Forces General Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan

4Department of Medical Research, Tri-Service General Hospital and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan

5National Defense Medical Center, Tri-Service General Hospital, Department of Medical Research, Taipei, Taiwan

6National Defense Medical Center, School of Nursing, Taipei, Taiwan

Correspondence to:

Wu-Chien Chien, email: chienwu@ndmctsgh.edu.tw

Huey-Fang Sun, email: hfsun21@ndmctsgh.edu.tw

Keywords: sleep disorder; postpartum depression; national health insurance research database (NHIRD)

Received: November 03, 2017     Accepted: April 04, 2018     Published: May 18, 2018

ABSTRACT

Postpartum depression has become an important topic of concern in recent years. However, very few studies on the causes of postpartum depression exist, and the effects of prenatal sleep disorders on the development of postpartum depression among pregnant women have not been elucidated. This study aimed to understand the association between prenatal sleep disorders and postpartum depression. The National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan (between 2000 and 2010) was used to assess the effects of prenatal sleep disorder on the risk of postpartum depression using Cox regression analyses. Prenatal sleep disorder in pregnant women increased the risk of developing postpartum depression (the risk in the sleep disorder cases was 5.359-fold increased compared with control cases). In addition, regardless of postpartum week (≤ 6 weeks, 6–12 weeks, or > 12weeks), the risk of developing postpartum depression in pregnant women with prenatal sleep disorders were increased, by 5.461-fold (P < 0.001), 3.490-fold (P = 0.010), and 3.416-fold (P = 0.015), respectively, compared with pregnant women without sleep disorders. Pregnant women with prenatal sleep disorders exhibited increased risks of developing postpartum depression. For pregnant women with prenatal sleep disorder, postpartum intervention measures should be provided as early as possible to reduce the risk of developing postpartum depression.


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