Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Premorbid BMI as a prognostic factor in small-cell lung cancer—a single institute experience

Cho-Hao Lee, Chin Lin, Chieh-Yung Wang, Tzu-Chuan Huang, Yi-Ying Wu, Wu-Chien Chien and Jia-Hong Chen _

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Oncotarget. 2018; 9:24642-24652. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.24935

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Abstract

Cho-Hao Lee1, Chin Lin2,3, Chieh-Yung Wang4, Tzu-Chuan Huang1, Yi-Ying Wu1, Wu-Chien Chien2 and Jia-Hong Chen1,5

1Division of Hematology and Oncology Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China

2School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China

3Department of Research and Development, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China

4Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China

5Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China

Correspondence to:

Jia-Hong Chen, email: ndmc_tw.tw@yahoo.com.tw

Keywords: overweight; small-cell lung cancer; prognostic factor; body mass index

Received: September 29, 2017     Accepted: March 05, 2018     Published: May 15, 2018

ABSTRACT

Numerous evidence has indicated that excess weight is associated with an increased risk of mortality in patients in several cancer types including breast, colorectal, pancreatic, endometrial, and prostate cancer However, with respect to non-small cell lung cancer and upper aero-digestive cancer, evidence suggests that low body mass index (BMI) may increase the risk of mortality of these cancers, but a definitive link between premorbid BMI and overall survival in small cell lung cancer patients has yet to be fully explored. To investigate this possibility, we conducted a retro-spective of 173 small-cell lung cancer patients. Multivariate Cox analysis indicated that pretreatment overweight (BM I ≥ 23) was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) (Hazard ratio, = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.39–0.87, p = 0.008). In addition, meta-regression revealed that per-formance status (≤ 2) marginally interacted with increased BMI (p = 0.068). However, subgroup analysis showed that patients with a BMI ≥ 23 and performance status ≤ 2 had the best OS (Hazard ratio: 0.31, 95% CI: 0.16–0.61, p = 0.001). Premorbid BMI and performance status level are easy to measure and may provide physicians an additional measurement to predict a small-cell lung cancer patient’s survival. The data from the present study indicates that a, further large scale prospective study is warranted to better assess the association of pretreatment BMI and OS in small-cell lung cancer. 


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