Oncotarget

Meta-Analysis:

Association between the Glutathione-S-transferase T1 null genotype and esophageal cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis involving 11,163 subjects

Feng He _, Changyu Liu, Ruijie Zhang, Zhipeng Hao, Yangkai Li, Ni Zhang and Liang Zheng

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Oncotarget. 2018; 9:15111-15121. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.24534

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Abstract

Feng He1, Changyu Liu1, Ruijie Zhang1, Zhipeng Hao1, Yangkai Li1, Ni Zhang1 and Liang Zheng2

1Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China

2Department of Thoracic Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Changzhou 213003, China

Correspondence to:

Ni Zhang, email: zhangnidoc@gmail.com

Liang Zheng, email: zhengliang1019@163.com

Keywords: Glutathione-S-transferase T1; esophageal cancer; gene polymorphism; meta-analysis

Received: June 20, 2017     Accepted: September 21, 2017     Epub: February 20, 2018     Published: March 13, 2018

ABSTRACT

Background: Glutathione-S-Transferase T1 (GSTT1) null genotype has been shown to be associated with the risk of esophageal cancer. However, the results remain inconsistent. Thus a comprehensive meta-analysis was conducted to assess the strength of association between GSTT1 null genotype and the risk of esophageal cancer.

Materials and Methods: A literature search of PubMed, Embase, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Wanfang databases up to March 31, 2017 was conducted and 30 eligible articles with 4482 cases and 6681 controls were finally recruited. The strength of correlation between GSTT1 polymorphism and the susceptibility of esophageal cancer was assessed by the crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup analyses and sensitivity analyses were performed to further identify the association.

Results: GSTT1 null genotype significantly increased the risk of esophageal cancer (OR = 1.20; 95% CI 1.04–1.40; P < 0.05). In a subgroup analysis by ethnicity, GSTT1 null genotype was correlated with a significantly increased risk of esophageal cancer among Asians (OR = 1.33; 95% CI 1.12–1.58; P < 0.05), instead of Caucasians or Africans (OR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.65–1.26; P > 0.05 for Caucasians and OR = 1.32; 95% CI 0.98–1.77; P > 0.05 for Africans). In the analysis by histological type, GSTT1 null genotype was correlated with a significantly increased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR = 1.34; 95% CI 1.12–1.61; P < 0.05), particularly among Asians (OR = 1.54; 95% CI 1.30–1.82; P < 0.05), but not among Caucasians or Africans (OR = 0.87; 95% CI 0.48–1.57; P > 0.05 for Caucasians and OR = 1.32; 95% CI 0.98–1.77; P > 0.05 for Africans). In addition, there is no significant correlation between GSTT1 null genotype and the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (OR = 0.98; 95% CI 0.71–1.35; P > 0.05).

Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that GSTT1 null genotype significantly increases esophageal cancer risk, particularly in Asians.


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