Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Survey of urinary nickel in peritoneal dialysis patients

Ya-Ching Huang, Hsiao-Chen Ning, Shang-Syuan Chen, Chia-Ni Lin, I-Kwan Wang, Shu-Man Weng, Cheng-Hao Weng, Ching-Wei Hsu, Wen-Hung Huang, Jang-Jih Lu, Tsu-Lan Wu and Tzung-Hai Yen _

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Oncotarget. 2017; 8:60469-60478. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.19730

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Abstract

Ya-Ching Huang1,2,*, Hsiao-Chen Ning1,2,*, Shang-Syuan Chen1, Chia-Ni Lin1,2, I-Kwan Wang3, Shu-Man Weng4, Cheng-Hao Weng4, Ching-Wei Hsu4, Wen-Hung Huang4, Jang-Jih Lu1, Tsu-Lan Wu1,2 and Tzung-Hai Yen4,5,6

1Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan

2Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan

3Department of Nephrology, Chang Medical University Hospital and College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan

4Department of Nephrology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan

5Kidney Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan

6Center for Tissue Engineering, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan

*These authors have contributed equally to this work

Correspondence to:

Tzung-Hai Yen, email: [email protected]

Keywords: peritoneal dialysis, nickel, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, inflammation, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

Received: May 14, 2017    Accepted: June 30, 2017    Published: July 31, 2017

ABSTRACT

This study surveyed urinary nickel concentrations in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, and analyzed the association of urinary nickel concentrations with clinical outcomes and inflammatory biomarkers. In total, 50 PD patients and 50 healthy controls were recruited for this study. All participants were examined for the presence of toxic trace elements (antimony, arsenic, bismuth, cadmium, copper, manganese, mercury, nickel, lead, tellurium, thallium and zinc) in their urine by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It was found that PD patients demonstrated higher urinary nickel concentrations than healthy controls (6.1±3.5 versus 2.8±1.4 μg/L, P<0.001). There were 24 (48.0%) PD patients with normal urinary nickel concentrations, and 26 (52.0%) PD patients with high urinary nickel concentrations. The PD patients with high urinary nickel concentrations demonstrated higher log serum levels of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (0.4±0.5 versus 0.1±0.5 mg/L, P=0.046) than patients with normal urinary nickel concentrations. Furthermore, patients with high urinary nickel concentrations exhibited higher levels of cadmium (1.3±0.9 versus 0.6±0.5 μg/L, P<0.001), copper (7.7±5.7 versus 3.3±1.4 μg/L, P<0.001) and manganese (0.9±1.1 versus 0.4±0.4 μg/L, P=0.023) than patients with normal urinary nickel concentrations. Nevertheless, there were no significant differences in the clinical outcomes between PD patients with high and normal urinary nickel concentrations (P>0.05). Thus, it is concluded that approximately half of the patients undergoing PD had elevated urinary nickel levels, and these patients also had elevated serum levels of high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Nevertheless, no other real correlations were discovered including no impact on patient outcome. Further studies are warranted.


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