Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Longitudinal rotation: a new way to detect the cardiotoxicity of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

Jun Huang _, Zi-Ning Yan, Yi-Fei Rui, Dan Shen, Li Fan and Dong-Liang Chen

PDF  |  HTML  |  How to cite

Oncotarget. 2017; 8:70072-70083. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.19585

Metrics: PDF 1166 views  |   HTML 2098 views  |   ?  


Abstract

Jun Huang1, Zi-Ning Yan1, Yi-Fei Rui1, Dan Shen1, Li Fan1 and Dong-Liang Chen1

1Department of Echocardiography, Changzhou No.2 People’s Hospital Affiliated to NanJing Medical University, Changzhou 213003, China

Correspondence to:

Jun Huang, email: [email protected]

Keywords: breast cancer, cardiotoxicity, chemotherapy, longitudinal rotation, anthracycline-based

Received: May 10, 2017    Accepted: June 28, 2017    Published: July 26, 2017

ABSTRACT

Background and aims: The study was to compare cardiac parameters before and after anthracycline-based chemotherapy and identify a parameter for detecting cardiotoxicity in breast cancer patients.

Methods: Cardiac function in 43 female breast cancer patients was evaluated at three time points: baseline, 1-3 days before the initiation of anthracycline-based chemotherapy; 3 weeks and 6 months after the final cycle of chemotherapy. At each visit, the peak longitudinal velocity; strain rate; peak systolic strain; peak systolic longitudinal displacement, and segmental and global longitudinal rotation degrees of the left ventricular were measured.

Results: The peak early-diastole left ventricular wall velocity at baseline was significantly higher than the values at 3 weeks and 6 months after the final cycle of chemotherapy. The absolute value of the lateral wall peak systolic longitudinal rotation degrees was significantly higher at baseline than at 3 weeks and 6 months after the final cycle of chemotherapy, whereas the absolute value of the global peak systolic longitudinal rotation degrees at baseline was significantly lower than the values at 3 weeks and 6 months after the final cycle of chemotherapy. None of the measured parameters differed significantly between the 3 weeks and 6 months after the final cycle of chemotherapy.

Conclusions: Cardiac diastolic and systolic dysfunction was found after anthracycline-based chemotherapy in this study, and the peak systolic longitudinal rotation degrees can be used to detect dysfunction after chemotherapy. The cardiotoxicity of epirubicin-based chemotherapy is stronger than that of therarubicin-based chemotherapy.


Creative Commons License All site content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
PII: 19585