Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Association of striking life events with primary breast cancer in 265 Chinese women: a case-control study

Yan Lin, Shengsheng Wang, Xiaohui Zhang, Changjun Wang, Guangliang Shan, Yidong Zhou, Feng Mao, Jinghong Guan, Xin Huang, Ying Zhong and Qiang Sun _

PDF  |  HTML  |  How to cite

Oncotarget. 2017; 8:82103-82113. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.18744

Metrics: PDF 1134 views  |   HTML 1477 views  |   ?  


Abstract

Yan Lin1,*, Shengsheng Wang2,*, Xiaohui Zhang1, Changjun Wang1, Guangliang Shan3, Yidong Zhou1, Feng Mao1, Jinghong Guan1, Xin Huang1, Ying Zhong1, Qiang Sun1

1Department of Breast Disease, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China

2Physical Examination Center, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China

3Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China

*These authors have contributed equally to this work

Correspondence to:

Qiang Sun, email: [email protected]

Keywords: breast cancer, case-control study, striking life events

Abbreviations: BMI: body mass index; CI: confidence intervals; ORs: odds ratios.

Received: November 15, 2016     Accepted: March 19, 2017     Published: June 27, 2017

ABSTRACT

The current case-control study investigated the relationship between striking life events and breast cancer in Chinese women. A total of 265 primary breast cancer patients and 265 controls were enrolled with matching for age and completed questionnaires. Logistic regression analysis was used. Thirty-nine breast cancer patients reported striking life events and twenty-four of the controls reported striking life events. The number of striking life events was significantly greater in patients (p = 0.04). It indicated a striking life event led to a 1.726-fold increased HR (95% CI 1.005-2.965, p < 0.05) for breast cancer with adjustment for age, and a 1.811-fold increased HR (95% CI 1.021 - 3.212, P < 0.05) with adjustment for age, BMI, and late age at menopause. High BMI (OR: 1.680, 95% CI: 1.258-2.196, p < 0.05) and a family history of breast cancer (OR: 2.244, 95% CI: 1.065-4.729, p < 0.05, respectively) increased the risk of breast cancer, and late age at menopause decreased the risk for breast cancer (OR: 0.513, 95% CI: 0.303-0.868, p < 0.05). Our findings indicate a significant association between striking life events and breast cancer in Chinese women, especially in the subpopulation with high BMI or family history of breast cancer.


Creative Commons License All site content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
PII: 18744