Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Inhibiting G protein βγ signaling blocks prostate cancer progression and enhances the efficacy of paclitaxel

Prakash Paudyal, Qing Xie, Prasanna Kuma Vaddi, Michael D. Henry and Songhai Chen _

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Oncotarget. 2017; 8:36067-36081. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.16428

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Abstract

Prakash Paudyal1, Qing Xie1, Prasanna Kuma Vaddi1, Michael D. Henry2,3,4,6, Songhai Chen1,5,6

1The Department of Pharmacology, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA

2The Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA

3The Department of Pathology, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA

4The Department of Urology, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA

5The Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA

6The Department of Internal Medicine, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA

Correspondence to:

Songhai Chen, email: songhai-chen@uiowa.edu

Keywords: G protein-coupled receptors, Gβγ, prostate cancer growth and metastasis, cancer stem cells

Received: August 17, 2016     Accepted: March 11, 2017     Published: March 21, 2017

ABSTRACT

Aberrant activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is implicated in prostate cancer progression, but targeting them has been challenging because multiple GPCRs are involved in cancer progression. In this study, we tested the effect of blocking signaling via a hub through which multiple GPCRs converge — the G-protein Gβγ subunits. Inhibiting Gβγ signaling in several castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines (i.e. PC3, DU145 and 22Rv1), impaired cell growth and migration in vitro, and halted tumor growth and metastasis in nude mice. The blockade of Gβγ signaling also diminished prostate cancer stem cell-like activities, by reducing tumorsphere formation in vitro and tumor formation in a limiting dilution assay in nude mice. Furthermore, Gβγ blockade enhanced the sensitivity of prostate cancer cells to paclitaxel treatment, both in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results identify a novel function of Gβγ in regulating prostate cancer stem-cell-like activities, and demonstrate that targeting Gβγ signaling is an effective approach in blocking prostate cancer progression and augmenting response to chemotherapy.


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