Oncotarget

Research Papers:

MSMB gene rs10993994 polymorphism increases the risk of prostate cancer

Tao Peng _, Lifeng Zhang, Lijie Zhu and Yuanyuan Mi

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Oncotarget. 2017; 8:28494-28501. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.15312

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Abstract

Tao Peng1, Lifeng Zhang2, Lijie Zhu1, Yuan-Yuan Mi1

1Department of Urology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Wuxi, PR China

2Department of Urology, Changzhou No.2 People′s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Changzhou, Jiangsu Province, China

Correspondence to:

Lifeng Zhang, email: 3258479087@qq.com

Lijie Zhu, email: lijie_zhumed@163.com

Yuan-Yuan Mi, email: myywxsy2016@sina.com

Keywords: MSMB, prostate cancer, rs10993994, meta-analysis, single nucleotide polymorphism

Received: December 01, 2016     Accepted: January 11, 2017     Published: February 14, 2017

ABSTRACT

Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) identified microseminoprotein-β (MSMB) gene rs10993994 polymorphism was significantly associated with prostate cancer (PC) risk. However, the association between MSMB gene rs10993994 polymorphism and PC risk remains controversial. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis by searching in the databases of PubMed, and Embase. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by using fixed-effect or random-effect models. A total of 11 publications containing 13 case-control studies for rs10993994 polymorphism were included in our analysis. Our data indicated that MSMB gene rs10993994 polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of PC. Stratification analyses of ethnicity suggested rs10993994 polymorphism increased the risk of PC among Caucasians, but not among Asians. In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicates that MSMB gene rs10993994 polymorphism increases the risk of PC.


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