Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Elevated fibrous sheath interacting protein 1 levels are associated with poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer patients

Yuqiang Mao, Ran Xu, Xiaoying Liu, Wenjun Shi and Yun Han _

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Oncotarget. 2017; 8:12186-12193. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.14575

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Abstract

Yuqiang Mao1, Ran Xu1, Xiaoying Liu2, Wenjun Shi1, Yun Han1

1Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004, China

2Department of Plastic Surgery, The First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, China

Correspondence to:

Yun Han, email: [email protected]

Keywords: fibrous sheath interacting protein 1, non-small cell lung cancer, prognosis, TNM staging

Received: November 14, 2016     Accepted: December 09, 2016     Published: January 10, 2017

ABSTRACT

In this study, we examined the expression and prognostic value of fibrous sheath interacting protein 1 (FSIP1) in 202 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who underwent lung cancer resection at Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University. FSIP1 mRNA and protein expression were measured in NSCLC tissues and non-tumor adjacent tissues (NATs), and Harrell’s concordance index (c-index) was used to evaluate the ability of FSIP1 to predict prognosis. FSIP1 mRNA and protein expression was higher in NSCLC tissues than in NATs. Survival analysis revealed the 5-year overall survival rate to be 35.4% in the FSIP1-positive group and 56.3% in the FSIP1-negative group, and FSIP1-positive status was an independent prognostic factor for poor overall survival. The c-index value of FSIP1 for overall survival was greater than that of Ki67, and the addition of FSIP1 status increased the c-index value of the TNM staging system. These results suggest that evaluating FSIP1 status in addition to TNM stage during routine pathological examinations could improve prognostic predictions in NSCLC patients.


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