Oncotarget

In The News - Press Releases


Radiation induces iatrogenic immunosuppression by indirectly affecting hematopoiesis


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
2020-05-15

Volume 11, Number 19 of @Oncotarget reported that the research team found that irradiated cells traffic to the bone marrow and bring about the reduction of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells.

RNA Sequencing and gene set enrichment analysis of the bone marrow cells following irradiation showed down-regulation of genes involved in hematopoiesis.

Dr. Dinesh Thotala from The Department of Radiation Oncology as well as The Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis School of Medicine both at The Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, USA said, "The immune system plays an important role in keeping us healthy from pathogens and foreign bodies including cancer cells."

"The immune system plays an important role in keeping us healthy from pathogens and foreign bodies including cancer cells."

- Dr. Dinesh Thotala, The Department of Radiation Oncology as well as The Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis School of Medicine

Direct damage to the T-cells from radiation will reduce the number of T-cells in circulation which should be repopulated in 80-90 days.

The central hypothesis is that long-term RIL involves not only T-cells but also indirect effects on hematopoietic stem cells.

The authors also analyzed the T and B cells from blood-forming organs that include blood, spleen, thymus, and bone marrow.

Figure 1: Radiation depletes cells in blood, spleen, and thymus. Schematic representation of the treatment plan for mice (A). The mouse thorax or head was irradiated with 1.8 Gy for 5 days consequently. The blood, spleen and thymus from the mice were analyzed 1 day post irradiation, untreated mice were used as controls. Irradiation depletes CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD19 in the blood (B, C) and spleen (D, E). Irradiation depletes double positive (DP) and double negative (DN) populations (F, G) along with DN1, DN2, and DN3 populations (H, I) in thymus. SD are from at least three treatments.

They found that irradiation affects the T-cells and B-cells in the spleen, thymus, and bone marrow.

This study identified the depletion of the CD11a expression in the HSC and progenitor cells in the bone marrow and downregulation of expression of hematopoiesis genes in the bone marrow stem cells.

The Thotala Research Team concluded in their Oncotarget Research Article that they identified and quantitated gene expression changes after irradiation and they used Gene set enrichment analysis to identify classes of genes that are over-represented in a broad set of associated genes.

Sign up for free Altmetric alerts about this article

DOI - https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.27564

Full text - https://www.oncotarget.com/article/27564/text/

Correspondence to - Dinesh Thotala - dthotala@wustl.edu

Keywords - radiation, lymphopenia, mass cytometry RNA sequencing

About Oncotarget

Oncotarget is a weekly, peer-reviewed, open access biomedical journal covering research on all aspects of oncology.

To learn more about Oncotarget, please visit https://www.oncotarget.com or connect with:

SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/oncotarget
Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Oncotarget/
Twitter - https://twitter.com/oncotarget
LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/oncotarget
Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/oncotarget/
Reddit - https://www.reddit.com/user/Oncotarget/

Oncotarget is published by Impact Journals, LLC please visit http://www.ImpactJournals.com or connect with @ImpactJrnls

Media Contact
MEDIA@IMPACTJOURNALS.COM
18009220957x105



Copyright © 2020 Impact Journals, LLC
Impact Journals is a registered trademark of Impact Journals, LLC