Oncotarget

Research Papers: Immunology:

Haemonchus contortus excretory and secretory proteins (HcESPs) suppress functions of goat PBMCs in vitro

Javaid Ali Gadahi, Bu Yongqian, Muhammad Ehsan, Zhen Chao Zhang, Shuai Wang, Ruo Feng Yan, Xiao Kai Song, Li Xin Xu and Xiang Rui Li _

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Oncotarget. 2016; 7:35670-35679. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.9589

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Abstract

Javaid Ali Gadahi1, Bu Yongqian1, Muhammad Ehsan1, Zhen Chao Zhang1, Shuai Wang1, Ruo Feng Yan1, Xiao Kai Song1, Li Xin Xu1 and Xiang Rui Li1

1 College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, PR China

Correspondence to:

Xiang Rui Li, email:

Keywords: Haemonchus contortus, ESP, goat, PBMC, immunomodulation, Immunology and Microbiology Section, Immune response, Immunity

Received: March 13, 2016 Accepted: May 17, 2016 Published: May 25, 2016

Abstract

Excretory and secretory products (ESPs) of nematode contain various proteins which are capable of inducing the instigation or depression of the host immune response and are involved in the pathogenesis of the worms. In the present study, Haemonchus contortus excretory and secretory products (HcESPs) were collected from the adult worms. Binding of HcESPs to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was confirmed by immune-fluorescence assay. Effects of the HcESPs on cytokine production, cell proliferation, cell migration and nitric oxide (NO) production of PBMCs were checked by co-incubation of HcESPs with goat PBMCs. The results indicated that the production of IL-4 and IFN-γ were significantly decreased by HcESPs in dose dependent manner. On the contrary, the production of IL-10 and IL-17 were increased. Cell migration was significantly enhanced by HcESPs, whereas, HcESPs treatment significantly suppressed the cell proliferation and NO production. These results indicated that the HcESPs played important suppressive regulatory roles on PBMCs and provided highlights to the understanding of the host-parasite interactions.


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