Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Pre-diagnostic leukocyte mitochondrial DNA copy number and risk of lung cancer

Shasha Meng, Immaculata De Vivo, Liming Liang, Zhibin Hu, David C. Christiani, Edward Giovannucci and Jiali Han _

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Oncotarget. 2016; 7:27307-27312. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.8426

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Abstract

Shasha Meng1, Immaculata De Vivo1,2, Liming Liang1, Zhibin Hu3, David C. Christiani4,5, Edward Giovannucci1,2,6, Jiali Han7,8

1Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

2Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

3Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

4Department of Environmental Health, Harvard University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

5Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

6Department of Nutrition, Harvard University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

7Department of Epidemiology, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

8Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

Correspondence to:

Jiali Han, e-mail: [email protected]

Keywords: mitochondrial DNA copy number, lung cancer risk, oxidative stress, prospective cohort, case-control study

Received: December 06, 2015     Accepted: March 16, 2016     Published: March 27, 2016

ABSTRACT

We prospectively investigated the relationship between mtCN and the risk of lung cancer in 463 case-control pairs from two prospective cohort studies, the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS). The adjusted least-squares means of log-transformed mtCN (log_mtCN) by smoking status were estimated by generalized linear models. Multivariable conditional logistic regression model adjusting for confounders was used to obtain the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between log_mtCN and lung cancer risk. The adjusted least-squares mean of log_mtCN in heavy smokers was significantly lower than that in never smokers (P = 0.05). Compared to the high log_mtCN group, the risk of lung cancer was 1.29 (95% CI = 0.89–1.87) for the median group, and 1.11 (95% CI = 0.75–1.64) for the low group. Among current smokers, compared to participants with high levels of log_mtCN, those with median levels had a significantly higher risk of lung cancer (OR = 2.09; 95% CI = 1.12–3.90), but not those with low levels (OR = 1.37; 95% CI = 0.75–2.48). Further studies are warranted to confirm these findings.


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