Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Specific alterations in gut microbiota are associated with prognosis of Budd–Chiari syndrome

Yu-Ling Sun _, Wen-Qi Li, Peng-Xu Ding, Zhi-Wei Wang, Chang-Hua Wei, Xiu-Xian Ma, Rui-Fang Zhang, Yan Wu, Lin Zhou, Ruo-Peng Liang, Yan-Peng Zhang, Yi-Pu Zhao, Rong-Tao Zhu and Jian Li

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Oncotarget. 2018; 9:3303-3320. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.23234

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Abstract

Yu-Ling Sun1,2, Wen-Qi Li1,2, Peng-Xu Ding3, Zhi-Wei Wang3, Chang-Hua Wei4, Xiu-Xian Ma1,2, Rui-Fang Zhang5, Yan Wu6, Lin Zhou7, Ruo-Peng Liang1,2, Yan-Peng Zhang1,2, Yi-Pu Zhao1,2, Rong-Tao Zhu1,2 and Jian Li1,2

1Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China

2Institute of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Diseases, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China

3Department of Radioactive Intervention, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China

4Department of Ultrasound Diagnosis, The People’s Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China

5Department of Ultrasound Diagnosis, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China

6Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China

7Department of Digestive Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China

Correspondence to:

Yu-Ling Sun, email: [email protected]

Keywords: Budd–Chiari syndrome; gut microbiota; prognosis

Received: August 28, 2017     Accepted: November 14, 2017     Published: December 14, 2017

ABSTRACT

Gut microbiota is associated with liver diseases. However, gut microbial characteristics of Budd-Chiari syndrome (B-CS) have not been reported. Here, by MiSeq sequencing, gut microbial alterations were characterized among 37 health controls, 20 liver cirrhosis (LC) patients, 31 initial B-CS patients (B-CS group), 33 stability patients after BCS treatment (stability group) and 23 recurrent patients after BCS treatment (recurrence group). Gut microbial diversity was increased in B-CS versus LC. Bacterial community of B-CS clustered with controls but separated from LC. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) 421, 502 (Clostridium IV) and 141 (Megasphaera) were unique to B-CS. Genera Escherichia/Shigella and Clostridium XI were decreased in B-CS versus controls. Moreover, nine genera, mainly including Bacteroides and Megamonas, were enriched in B-CS versus LC. Notably, Megamonas could distinguish B-CS from LC with areas under the curve (AUCs) of 0.7904. Microbial function prediction revealed that L-amino acid transport system activity was decreased in B-CS versus both LC and controls. Furthermore, OTUs 27 (Clostridium XI), 137 (Clostridium XIVb) and 40 (Bacteroides) were associated with B-CS stability. Importantly, genus Clostridium XI was enriched in stability group versus both recurrence group and B-CS group. Also, PRPP glutamine biosynthesis was reduced in stability group versus recurrence group, but was enriched in stability group versus B-CS group. In conclusion, specific microbial alterations associated with diagnosis and prognosis were detected in B-CS patients. Correction of gut microbial alterations may be a potential strategy for B-CS prevention and treatment.


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