Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Prognostic role of pretreatment platelet to lymphocyte ratio in urologic cancer

Jianfeng Wang, Yang Liu, Naiwen Zhang, Xuejie Li, Peng Xin, Jianbin Bi _ and Chuize Kong

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Oncotarget. 2017; 8:70874-70882. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.20147

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Abstract

Jianfeng Wang1, Yang Liu1, Naiwen Zhang1, Xuejie Li1, Peng Xin1, Jianbin Bi1 and Chuize Kong1

1Department of Urology, The First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, P.R. China

Correspondence to:

Jianbin Bi, email: [email protected]

Chuize Kong, email: [email protected]

Keywords: platelet to lymphocyte ratio, urologic cancer, prognosis, meta-analysis

Received: April 07, 2017     Accepted: May 23, 2017     Published: August 10, 2017

ABSTRACT

The prognostic value of platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) in urologic cancer does not reach a consensus. Herein, we performed the meta-analysis to determine the prognostic role of PLR in patients with urologic cancer. A literature search was performed in the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases. Hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted to estimate the association between PLR and prognosis. A total of 20 articles comprising 6079 patients were included in this study. The pooled results showed that a high PLR was significantly associated with worse prognosis of overall survival (OS) in urologic cancer [HR=1.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.37-1.99, P<0.01]. The result also indicated that an elevated PLR was significantly associated with poor OS in renal cancer (HR=1.88, 95% CI=1.39-2.55, P<0.01). In addition, the significant association between poor OS and elevated PLR in renal cancer was consistent regardless of treatment, cut-off value, sample size and study quality. Our result also indicated that an elevated PLR predicted shorter OS (HR=1.78, 95% CI=1.38-2.30, P<0.01) and cancer-specific survival (HR=2.02, 95% CI=1.24-3.29, P<0.01) in prostate cancer. In conclusion, an elevated PLR was a predictive indicator of poor survival in renal cancer and prostate cancer.


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