Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Dietary inflammatory index and the risk of gastric cancer in a Korean population

Sunghee Lee, Jeonghee Lee, Il Ju Choi, Young-Woo Kim, Keun Won Ryu, Young-Il Kim, Jin-Kyung Oh, Binh Thang Tran and Jeongseon Kim _

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Oncotarget. 2017; 8:85452-85462. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.20008

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Abstract

Sunghee Lee1,4, Jeonghee Lee1, Il Ju Choi2, Young-Woo Kim2,3, Keun Won Ryu2, Young-Il Kim2, Jin-Kyoung Oh3, Binh Thang Tran3 and Jeongseon Kim1

1Department of Cancer Biomedical Science, Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Goyang, South Korea

2Center for Gastric Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang, South Korea

3Department of Cancer Control and Population Health, Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Goyang, South Korea

4Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Health Science, Kangwon National University, Samcheok, South Korea

Correspondence to:

Jeongseon Kim, email: [email protected]

Keywords: inflammation, diet, gastric cancer, interaction, case-control study

Received: December 23, 2016    Accepted: June 10, 2017    Published: August 07, 2017

ABSTRACT

We aimed to investigate the association with the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DIITM) on the risk of gastric cancer and whether histological type modifies this association. From March 2011 to December 2014, 388 cases and 776 controls were enrolled at the National Cancer Center. Utilizing a food frequency questionnaire, thirty-five food components were used to score the DII. The tertile distribution of DII for controls was as follows: T1: <0.96, T2: 0.96-2.97, and T3: ≥2.97. To investigate the association between DII and the gastric cancer risk, multivariable logistic models were constructed. In subgroup analyses, histological types including intestinal and diffuse types were examined. As the DII increased, gastric cancer risk increased (p-value for trend =0.007). Participants in the highest DII tertile had a greater gastric cancer risk compared to those in the lowest tertile [Odds Ratio (OR) =1.63, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.15-2.29]. Stratification by sex revealed that men who were in the highest DII tertile showed a greater risk of intestinal type (OR=2.03, 95% CI 1.09-3.77). Participants positive for H. pylori infection had higher risk of intestinal type (OR=2.16, 95% CI 1.21-3.87). In this case-control study, we found a significantly positive association with a pro-inflammatory diet on gastric cancer risk, after adjusting for covariates. Future studies are suggested to prospectively examine the effect of a pro-inflammatory diet on gastric cancer risk.


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