Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Cancer risk in patients with candidiasis: a nationwide population-based cohort study

Li-Min Chung _, Ji-An Liang, Cheng-Li Lin, Li-Min Sun and Chia-Hung Kao

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Oncotarget. 2017; 8:63562-63573. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.18855

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Abstract

Li-Min Chung1, Ji-An Liang2,3, Cheng-Li Lin4,5, Li-Min Sun6 and Chia-Hung Kao2,7,8

1Department of Medical Oncology, Zuoying Branch of Kaohsiung Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

2Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan

3Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan

4Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan

5College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan

6Department of Radiation Oncology, Zuoying Branch of Kaohsiung Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

7Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan

8Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan

Correspondence to:

Chia-Hung Kao, email: [email protected]

Keywords: candidiasis, cancer, population-based cohort study

Received: May 10, 2017     Accepted: June 05, 2017     Published: June 29, 2017

ABSTRACT

Background: Candidiasis and certain types of cancer are related to immunocompromised status. This study aimed to evaluate whether Candida infection (CI) is associated with subsequent cancer risk in Taiwan.

Methods: Data from the National Health Insurance system of Taiwan were used to evaluate the association between CI and cancer risk. The CI cohort comprised 34,829 patients. Each patient was randomly frequency matched with one person from the general population without CI on the basis of age, sex, year of index date of CI diagnosis, and other characteristics to generate the control group. We used Cox’s proportional hazard regression analysis to estimate the effects of CI on subsequent cancer risk.

Results: Compared with the control group, patients with CI had a significantly higher risk of overall cancer (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.19, 95% confidence interval = 1.09–1.30). For subsite analysis, the risks of hematologic malignancy and head and neck, pancreatic, skin, and thyroid cancers were significantly higher in the CI group. Stratified analyses by sex, age, and follow-up time revealed different patterns.

Conclusion: Our study suggested that CI can significantly increase overall and some individual cancer risks, which is partially compatible with previous findings.


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