Oncotarget

Research Papers:

A single nucleotide polymorphism of AIRE gene located in the 21q22.3 increases the risk of rheumatoid arthritis

Yuan-Sheng Xu, Xi-Jia Jiang _ and Jian-Min Chen

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Oncotarget. 2017; 8:71556-71562. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.17746

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Abstract

Yuan-Sheng Xu1, Xi-Jia Jiang2 and Jian-Min Chen1

1Department of Orthopaedics, Bayi Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210002, China

2Department of Orthopaedics, Changzhou No.2 People′s Hospital, Changzhou 213003, China

Correspondence to:

Xi-Jia Jiang, email: [email protected]

Jian-Min Chen, email: [email protected]

Keywords: AIRE, single nucleotide polymorphism, rheumatoid arthritis

Received: March 09, 2017     Accepted: April 15, 2017     Published: May 10, 2017

ABSTRACT

Several studies addressed the association of autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene polymorphism with the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, their conclusions were inconsistent. For better investigating the effects of this polymorphism on the risk of RA, we conducted this study to evaluate the role of AIRE rs2075786 polymorphism in the risk of RA. Four eligible studies involving 6,755 cases and 7,970 controls were identified by searching the databases of PubMed, CNKI and EMBASE up to February 2017. Our study revealed that AIRE rs2075786 polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of RA under all genetic models. In the subgroup analysis, AIRE rs2075786 polymorphism contributed to RA susceptibility among Asians, but not among Caucasians. To summarize,, this meta-analysis confirms that AIRE rs2075786 polymorphism may play a significant role in increasing the risk of RA. Stratification analysis by ethnicity reveals that AIRE rs2075786 polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of RA among Asians, but not among Caucasians. These findings need further validation in the large multicenter case-control studies.


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