Oncotarget

Research Papers:

An inverse association between tea consumption and colorectal cancer risk

Yuetong Chen, Yuan Wu, Mulong Du, Haiyan Chu, Lingjun Zhu, Na Tong, Zhengdong Zhang, Meilin Wang, Dongying Gu and Jinfei Chen _

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Oncotarget. 2017; 8:37367-37376. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.16959

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Abstract

Yuetong Chen1,2,*, Yuan Wu3,*, Mulong Du2,4,5,*, Haiyan Chu2, Lingjun Zhu6, Na Tong2, Zhengdong Zhang2,4, Meilin Wang2,4, Dongying Gu1, Jinfei Chen1,2

1Department of Oncology, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

2Department of Environmental Genomics, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Cancer Biomarkers, Prevention and Treatment, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Personalized Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

3Department of Medical Oncology, Jiangsu Cancer Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

4Department of Genetic Toxicology, The Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

5Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

6Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Correspondence to:

Jinfei Chen, email: [email protected]

Meilin Wang, email: [email protected].

Dongying Gu, email: [email protected].

Keywords: colorectal cancer, inverse association, tea consumption

Received: November 18, 2016     Accepted: March 29, 2017     Published: April 08, 2017

ABSTRACT

It is well known that the tea extracts, mainly polyphenols as chemo-preventive elements, could act as cancer progression blockers. Although the association between tea consumption and colorectal cancer risk has been widely investigated, the results still remain inconsistent. We conducted a dose-response meta-analysis to evaluate their relationships by enrolling qualified 29 literatures. The summary odds ratio (OR) of colorectal cancer for the highest vs. lowest tea consumption was 0.93 with 0.87–1.00 of 95% confidence intervals (CIs) among all studies with modest heterogeneity (P = 0.001, I2 = 43.4%). Stratified analysis revealed that tea, especially green tea, had a protective effect among female and rectal cancer patients. Particularly, the dose-response analysis showed that there was a significant inverse association between an increment of 1 cup/day of tea consumption and colorectal cancer risk in the subgroup of the green tea drinking (OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.96–1.01, Pnonlinear = 0.003) and female (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.56-0.81, Pnonlinear < 0.001). Our findings indicate that tea consumption has an inverse impact on colorectal cancer risk, which may have significant public health implications in the prevention of colorectal cancer and further similar researches.


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