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Blood glucose concentration and risk of liver cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies

Hedong Han, Tianyi Zhang, Zhichao Jin, Honglei Guo, Xin Wei, Yuzhou Liu, Qi Chen and Jia He _

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Oncotarget. 2017; 8:50164-50173. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.16816

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Abstract

Hedong Han1,*, Tianyi Zhang1,*, Zhichao Jin1,*, Honglei Guo2, Xin Wei3, Yuzhou Liu3, Qi Chen1 and Jia He1

1Department of Health Statistics, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China

2Department of Gastroenterology, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China

3Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and West Medical Center, New York, NY 10025, USA

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Correspondence to:

Jia He, email: hejia63@yeah.net

Keywords: blood glucose, liver cancer, meta-analysis, prospective studies

Received: November 16, 2016     Accepted: March 22, 2017     Published: April 04, 2017

ABSTRACT

The question of whether elevated blood glucose is a risk factor for liver cancer has been intensively studied, yet with inconsistent results. To explore the relationship between blood glucose concentration and risk of liver cancer, we conduct a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Literature search was comprehensively performed using database of PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library through October 2016. Random-effect models were used to combine the effect estimations. Eight articles containing ten studies with a total of 1975 liver cancer cases were included. The pooled RRs demonstrated that elevated fasting blood glucose was associated with increased risk of liver cancer (combined RRs: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.46, 2.13) with mild heterogeneity (I2 = 30.40%, P = 0.17). In sensitivity analysis, the pooled result remained significant (combined RRs: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.59; I2 = 33.90%, P = 0.16) when we restricted blood glucose categories in the range of nondiabetic subjects. We also detected a J-shaped non-linear dose-response relationship between blood glucose concentration and risk of liver cancer. There is evidence that elevated blood glucose increases risk of liver cancer across the range of prediabetes and diabetes. Considering the rapidly increasing prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes, controlling blood glucose may lower the risk of liver cancer.


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