Oncotarget

Reviews:

Emerging proteomics biomarkers and prostate cancer burden in Africa

Henry A. Adeola, Jonathan M. Blackburn, Timothy R. Rebbeck and Luiz F. Zerbini _

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Oncotarget. 2017; 8:37991-38007. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.16568

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Abstract

Henry A. Adeola1,2, Jonathan M. Blackburn2,3,Timothy R. Rebbeck4 and Luiz F. Zerbini1,2

1 International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Cape Town, South Africa

2 Department of Integrative Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa

3 Institute of Infectious Disease & Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa

4 Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Correspondence to:

Luiz F. Zerbini, email:

Keywords: proteomics, biomarker, prostate cancer, Africa, mass spectrometer

Received: November 23, 2016 Accepted: February 27, 2017 Published: March 25, 2017

Abstract

Various biomarkers have emerged via high throughput omics-based approaches for use in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. Many of these have yet to be demonstrated as having value in routine clinical practice. Moreover, there is a dearth of information on validation of these emerging prostate biomarkers within African cohorts, despite the huge burden and aggressiveness of prostate cancer in men of African descent. This review focusses of the global landmark achievements in prostate cancer proteomics biomarker discovery and the potential for clinical implementation of these biomarkers in Africa. Biomarker validation processes at the preclinical, translational and clinical research level are discussed here, as are the challenges and prospects for the evaluation and use of novel proteomic prostate cancer biomarkers.


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