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An updated meta-analysis of 37 case-control studies on the association between NFKB1 -94ins/del ATTG promoter polymorphism and cancer susceptibility

Yi-Qiao Luo, Duan Wang, Teng Gong and Jiang Zhu _

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Oncotarget. 2016; 7:58659-58670. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.10808

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Abstract

Yi-Qiao Luo1,*, Duan Wang2,*, Teng Gong3 and Jiang Zhu4

1 Department of Thoracic Oncology, West China Hospital/West China School of Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China

2 Department of Orthopaedics, West China School of Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China

3 Sichuan Mianyang 404 Hospital, Mianyang, China

4 Department of Thoracic Oncology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China

* These authors have contributed equally to this work

Correspondence to:

Jiang Zhu, email:

Keywords: NFKB1; polymorphism; cancer; meta-analysis

Received: April 10, 2016 Accepted: July 10, 2016 Published: July 24, 2016

Abstract

As a cell survival signal, nuclear factor-kappa B (NFKB) is associated with the pathogenesis of numerous malignancies. According to several studies, NFKB1 -94ins/del ATTG promoter polymorphism is associated with the risk of different malignancies, but the results were not consistent. Therefore, we performed an updated meta-analysis based on 37 case-control studies from 33 articles (16,271 cases and 22,781 controls) to clarify the relationship. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to determine the strength of the association. We found that the NFKB1 -94ins/del ATTG promoter polymorphism was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to cancer in the recessive (II vs. ID+DD, OR = 1.140, 95% CI = 1.029–1.263, p =0.012), homozygote (II vs. DD, OR = 1.259, 95% CI = 1.068–1.485, p =0.006), and allele (I vs. D, OR = 1.109, 95% CI = 1.025–1.199, p =0.010) genetic models. The subgroup analysis for ethnicity found that the NFKB1 -94ins/del ATTG promoter polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased susceptibility to cancer in Asians and with a decreased susceptibility in Caucasians. The stratified analyses revealed significant associations between the polymorphism and increased susceptibility to ovarian cancer, oral squamous cell carcinoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma.


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