Oncotarget

Clinical Research Papers:

Virus infection facilitates the development of severe pneumonia in transplant patients with hematologic malignancies

Caifeng Yue _, ZhiJie Kang, Kexin Ai, Duorong Xu, Jim Wu, Yujia Pan, JinSong Yan, Min Liu and Quentin Liu

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Oncotarget. 2016; 7:53930-53940. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.10182

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Abstract

Caifeng Yue1,2,3,*, ZhiJie Kang1,2,3,4,*, Kexin Ai1,2,3,*, Duorong Xu5, Jim Wu6, Yujia Pan1,2,3, JinSong Yan4, Min Liu1,2,3, Quentin Liu1,2,3

1Department of Hematology, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China

2Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China

3Institute of Cancer Stem Cell, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, China

4Department of Hematology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, China

5Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China

6Roche Pharmaceutical Research and Early Development, Shanghai, China

*These authors have contributed equally to this work

Correspondence to:

Quentin Liu, email: liuq9@mail.sysu.edu.cn

Keywords: cytomegalovirus (CMV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), co-infection, severe pneumonia, hematologic malignancies

Received: November 04, 2015    Accepted: May 16, 2016    Published: June 20, 2016

ABSTRACT

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an effective therapy for patients with hematologic malignancies. Severe pneumonia is associated with high mortality rate in HSCT recipients. Viral co-infection indicates a poor prognosis of HSCT recipients. In this study, a total of 68 allogeneic HSCT recipients were included. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection was assessed by testing peripheral blood and oropharynx swabs, respectively, collected in the first 180 days after transplantation. We analysed the correlation of CMV and RSV co-infection with severe pneumonia and mortality. The incidence of CMV and RSV co-infection was 26.5% (18/68). Severe pneumonia was diagnosed in 61% (11/18) cases with co-infection compared to only 10% (5/50) cases with mono-infection or no infection. The analysis of potential risk factors for severe pneumonia showed that CMV and RSV co-infection was significantly associated with severe pneumonia (p < 0.001). The 5 patients who died of severe pneumonia were all co-infected with CMV and RSV. In conclusion, CMV and RSV co-infection appears to be an important factor and facilitates the development of severe pneumonia in allogeneic HSCT patients with hematologic malignancies.


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