Oncotarget

Meta-Analysis:

The association between BRCA1 gene polymorphism and cancer risk: a meta-analysis

Gui-Ping Xu _, Qing Zhao, Ding Wang, Wen-Yue Xie, Li-Jun Zhang, Hua Zhou, Shi-Zhi Chen, Li-Fang Wu

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Oncotarget. 2018; 9:8681-8694. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.24064

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Abstract

Gui-Ping Xu1,*, Qing Zhao2,*, Ding Wang2, Wen-Yue Xie3, Li-Jun Zhang2, Hua Zhou2, Shi-Zhi Chen2 and Li-Fang Wu2

1Transfusion Department, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China

2Department of Laboratory Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China

3Department of Oncology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Correspondence to:

Li-Fang Wu, email: lifangwu0408@hotmail.com

Keywords: BRCA1; polymorphism; meta-analysis; cancer

Received: January 07, 2017     Accepted: November 17, 2017     Published: January 06, 2018

ABSTRACT

Many studies have reported that BRCA1 polymorphisms are associated with cancer risk, but the results remain controversial. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the relationship between BRCA1 polymorphisms (rs799917, rs1799950, rs1799966, or rs16941) and cancer risk. Relevant studies were identified via a systematic search of the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases up to July 31, 2017. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to examine the strength of the associations. Thirty-five studies published in 19 publications involving 28,094 cases and 50,657 controls were included in this meta-analysis. There was no obvious association between rs799917, rs1799966, or rs16941 polymorphisms and overall cancer risk in any genetic models. However, subgroup analyses revealed that the rs799917 polymorphism could decrease the risk of cervical cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), gastric cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) among Asian populations in one or more genetic models and that rs16941 could increase overall cancer risk among Caucasian populations in the homozygote and recessive models. Our meta-analysis also indicated that rs1799950 could decrease the breast cancer (BC) risk among Caucasian populations in the homozygote and recessive models. In summary, our results suggest that BRCA1 polymorphisms may play an important role in the etiology of cancer. However, due to the limited number of studies, these findings should be confirmed by new studies with larger sample sizes that address various types of cancer.


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