Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B55α functions in mouse oocyte maturation and early embryonic development

Shuang Liang, Jing Guo, Jeong-Woo Choi, Kyung-Tae Shin, Hai-Yang Wang, Yu-Jin Jo, Nam-Hyung Kim and Xiang-Shun Cui _

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Oncotarget. 2017; 8:26979-26991. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.15927

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Abstract

Shuang Liang1, Jing Guo1, Jeong-Woo Choi1, Kyung-Tae Shin1, Hai-Yang Wang1, Yu-Jin Jo1, Nam-Hyung Kim1, Xiang-Shun Cui1

1Department of Animal Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk, 361–763, Republic of Korea

Correspondence to:

Xiang-Shun Cui, email: xscui@cbnu.ac.kr

Nam-Hyung Kim, email: nhkim@cbun.ac.kr

Keywords: PP2A-B55α, oocyte maturation, cytokinesis, preimplantation development, reproduction

Received: December 08, 2016     Accepted: February 17, 2017     Published: March 06, 2017

ABSTRACT

Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B55α (PP2A-B55α) has been studied in mitosis. However, its functions in mammalian meiosis and early embryonic development remain unknown. Here, we report that PP2A-B55α is critical for mouse oocyte meiosis and preimplantation embryo development. Knockdown of PP2A-B55α in oocytes led to abnormal asymmetric division, disordered spindle dynamics, defects in chromosome congression, an increase in aneuploidy, and induction of the DNA damage response. Moreover, knockdown of PP2A-B55α in fertilized mouse zygotes impaired development to the blastocyst stage. The impairment of embryonic development might have been due to induction of sustained DNA damage in embryos, which caused apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation and outgrowth potential at the blastocyst stage. Overall, these results provide a novel insight into the role of PP2A-B55α as a novel meiotic and embryonic competence factor at the onset of life.


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