Oncotarget

Research Papers:

Effects of roniciclib in preclinical models of anaplastic thyroid cancer

Shu-Fu Lin _, Jen-Der Lin, Chuen Hsueh, Ting-Chao Chou and Richard J. Wong

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Oncotarget. 2017; 8:67990-68000. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.19092

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Abstract

Shu-Fu Lin1, Jen-Der Lin1, Chuen Hsueh2, Ting-Chao Chou3,4 and Richard J. Wong5

1Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan

2Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan

3Laboratory of Preclinical Pharmacology Core, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA

4Current address: PD Science, Inc., Paramus, NJ, USA

5Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA

Correspondence to:

Shu-Fu Lin, email: mmg@cgmh.org.tw

Keywords: roniciclib, cyclin-dependent kinase, anaplastic thyroid cancer

Received: March 02, 2017    Accepted: May 23, 2017    Published: July 08, 2017

ABSTRACT

Many human cancers have altered cyclin-dependent kinase activity. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases may arrest cell cycle progression and represents an important strategy in the treatment of malignancies. We evaluated the therapeutic effects of roniciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, as a treatment for anaplastic thyroid cancer. Roniciclib inhibited anaplastic thyroid cancer cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Roniciclib activated caspase-3 activity and induced apoptosis. Cell cycle progression was arrested in G2/M phase. In vivo, the growth of anaplastic thyroid cancer xenograft tumors was retarded by roniciclib treatment without evidence of toxicity. These data provide a rationale for further clinical evaluation using roniciclib in the treatment of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer.


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