Oncotarget

Research Papers:

E-cigarettes and flavorings induce inflammatory and pro-senescence responses in oral epithelial cells and periodontal fibroblasts

Isaac K. Sundar, Fawad Javed, Georgios E. Romanos and Irfan Rahman _

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Oncotarget. 2016; 7:77196-77204. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.12857

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Abstract

Isaac K. Sundar1, Fawad Javed2, Georgios E. Romanos3, Irfan Rahman1

1Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY

2Department of General Dentistry, Eastman Institute for Oral Health University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

3Department of Periodontology, School of Dental Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY

Correspondence to:

Irfan Rahman, email: irfan_rahman@urmc.rochester.edu

Keywords: e-cigarettes, e-juices, RAGE, COX2, PGE2

Received: August 02, 2016     Accepted: October 14, 2016     Published: October 24, 2016

ABSTRACT

Electronic-cigarettes (e-cigs) represent a significant and increasing proportion of tobacco product consumption, which may pose an oral health concern. Oxidative/carbonyl stress via protein carbonylation is an important factor in causing inflammation and DNA damage. This results in stress-induced premature senescence (a state of irreversible growth arrest which re-enforces chronic inflammation) in gingival epithelium, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of oral diseases. We show that e-cigs with flavorings cause increased oxidative/carbonyl stress and inflammatory cytokine release in human periodontal ligament fibroblasts, Human Gingival Epithelium Progenitors pooled (HGEPp), and epigingival 3D epithelium. We further show increased levels of prostaglandin-E2 and cycloxygenase-2 are associated with upregulation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) by e-cig exposure-mediated carbonyl stress in gingival epithelium/tissue. Further, e-cigs cause increased oxidative/carbonyl and inflammatory responses, and DNA damage along with histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) reduction via RAGE-dependent mechanisms in gingival epithelium. A greater response is elicited by flavored e-cigs. Increased oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory and pro-senescence responses (DNA damage and HDAC2 reduction) can result in dysregulated repair due to proinflammatory and pro-senescence responses in periodontal cells. These data highlight the pathologic role of e-cig aerosol and its flavoring to cells and tissues of the oral cavity in compromised oral health.


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